Thursday, 6 June 2013

Falconry and Hawking




Prince Henry Son of Henry II Hawking



King Stephen with his Hawk
from BL Royal MS 20 A II
King Stephen and a Hawk - Joseph Strutt


Extract from
Birds, Beasts and Becket: Falconry and hawking in the Lives and Miracles of St Thomas Becket
By Gesine Oppitz-Trotman
In
Peter B. Clarke; Tony Claydon (2010). God's Bounty?: The Churches and the Natural World. Boydell & Brewer. pp. 88–. ISBN 978-0-9546809-6-1.

"For Henry, Becket would be the hawk that did not return to its lure. having befriended, trained and appointed Thomas to a task he assumed he would perform. Henry would spend much of his reign chaising his errant companion, until he finally returned, only to fall out of the sky, dead, at the angry king's feet."

Hawking or falconry takes places along river-banks and waterways where ducks, cranes and herons gather, prey for the hawks and falcons. Ryver(e) in Chaucerian or Middle English meant to go hawking: the river-bank was the place for hawking. Indeed a hawk specially trained to hunt herons was called a heroner. Many of the kings of this period had the river banks of certain rivers fenced off, enclosed a private hawking grounds, with men [gamekeepers if you will] maintaining and patrolling them.


References



Joseph Strutt (1801). Glig Gamena Angel Deod, Or, the Sports and Pastimes of the People of England. - London, Bensley 1801. Chapter II: Hawking: Bensley. pp. 18–.


Casey Albert Wood; Florence Marjorie Fyfe (1943). The Art of Falconry: Being the De Arte Venandi Cum Avibus of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. Stanford University Press. pp. 1–. ISBN 978-0-8047-0374-1.

Gage Earle Freeman; Francis Henry Salvin (1859). Falconry, its claims, history, and practice. Contents.

The art and practice of hawking (1900)

Robin S. Oggins (2004). The Kings and Their Hawks: Falconry in Medieval England. Yale University Press. pp. 53–. ISBN 978-0-300-13038-6


The Kings and Their Hawks: Falconry in Medieval England
ROBIN S. OGGINS
Copyright Date: 2004
Published by: Yale University Press

Robin S. Oggins (2004). The Kings and Their Hawks: Falconry in Medieval England. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-10058-7

Tony Hunt (2009). Three Anglo-Norman Treatises on Falconry. Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature. ISBN 978-0-907570-19-6.

Peter B. Clarke; Tony Claydon (2010). God's Bounty?: The Churches and the Natural World. Boydell & Brewer. pp. 78–. ISBN 978-0-9546809-6-1


Helen Stewart; Andrew Stewart (2015). Historical Falconry: An Illustrated Guide. Amberley Publishing Limited. ISBN 978-1-4456-5115-6.

Robert E. Lewis (1986). Middle English Dictionary. Rivere: Banks of a river where the sport of hawking or practice of fowling is carried out. University of Michigan Press. pp. 762–. ISBN 0-472-01185-5.


Anglo-Norman Dictionary

also

The Divine Bird
Celestial Hawks
Hunting with Birds of the Sky

Latin: Accipitor [Accipitorem]
 

Robert M. Durling (2004). The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Volume 2: Purgatorio. Oxford University Press. pp. 272–. ISBN 978-0-19-987983-0.



Folk-Etymology. Ardent Media. pp. 140–.


Robin S. Oggins (2004). The Kings and Their Hawks: Falconry in Medieval England. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-10058-7.


The Origin and Earliest History of Falconry
Hans J. Epstein
Isis
Vol. 34, No. 6 (Autumn, 1943), pp. 497-509
Published by: The University of Chicago Press on behalf of The History of Science Society

The Decline of Falconry in Early Modern England
Richard Grassby
Past & Present
No. 157 (Nov., 1997), pp. 37-62
Published by: Oxford University Press on behalf of The Past and Present Society
 

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