Monday, 17 February 2014

Settlement of Fréteval, July 22nd 1170

"Why is the archbishop kept out of the country"

Richard Hurrell Froude; James Bowling Mozley (1839). Remains of the Late Reverend Richard Hurrell Froude: v. 2. J. G. & F. Rivington. pp. 497–.

 "One of the archbishop's historians, however (says that writer), writing some time after these events, and when information had come out to throw light upon them, gives an easy explanation of the whole conference:—' The king (says Fitzstephen) had the question put to him by some one, either in a letter or in a conversation— "Why is the archbishop kept out of the country? He will be far better in than out?" The hint was given to one who understood it. The king forthwith arranged a conference to treat of a peace, and there conceded everything which before he had refused. But first (the passage goes on) he caused his son to be crowned with dispatch, on account of a certain result which might possibly take place; so that if a crime were committed, the kingdom could not be punished on his account, seeing he would no longer be king of it." (Froude, p. 497)

MTB Volume III William FitzStephen 
https://archive.org/stream/materialsforhist03robe#page/106/mode/1up
Dictum fuit aliquem dixisse vel scripsisse regi Anglorum de archiepiscopo "Ut quid tenetur exclusus? melius tenebitur inclusus quam exclusus;" satisque fuit intelligenti. Unde et rex ad colloqum de pace festinavit, et ibi omnia prius negata, quae ab eo petebantur, concessit.

According to William fitzStephen one of the king's courtiers remarked to
the king, 'Why do you persist in keeping the archbishop abroad ? It would be
better to have him in England than out of it'. This consideration seems to have
carried some weight with Henry.

An Annotated Translation of the Life of St. Thomas Becket (Part Two)
p. 41
by William Fitzstephen trans. Mary Aelred Sinclair 
(1944)
Loyola University Chicago
http://ecommons.luc.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1368&context=luc_theses

The mastermind behind this settlement at Fréteval and also the Compromise at Avranches some years later after Becket's martyrdom was probably Arnulf, bishop of Lisieux. He was thanked by neither party for his efforts.

Carolyn Poling Schriber (1990). The dilemma of Arnulf of Lisieux: new ideas versus old ideals. Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-35097-8. p. 106

Carolyn Poling Schriber (1988). Arnulf of Lisieux: The Dilemmas of a Twelfth-century Norman Bishop. University of Colorado.


References

[Entrevue de Fréteval]








Le château de Fréteval

Anne J. Duggan (2000). The Correspondence of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1162-1170: Letters 176-329. Volume 2. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-820893-8. pp 1261-79
CTB 300  Becket to Pope Alexander III
After July 22nd 1170

Robertson, James Craigie. Materials for the History of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury. Vol. 7. 1885
MTB 684 Becket to Pope Alexander III
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k50324t/f347.image
Translation:  Richard Hurrell Froude (1839). Remains. Letter Becket to the Pope. pp. 503–.

Baron George Lyttelton Lyttelton (1769). The history of the life of King Henry the Second  Printed for J. Dodsley. pp. 509–.

Richard Hurrell Froude (1839). Remains. Chapter XX: Accommodation at Freitville. pp. 494–.

James J. Spigelman (2004). Becket & Henry: The Becket Lectures. James Spigelman. pp. 213–219. ISBN 978-0-646-43477-3.

James Craigie Robertson (1859). Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury. pp. 241–7.

Hutton (1899) Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury


Hutton (1910) Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury
James Craigie Robertson (1859). Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury. pp. 241–7

Maurice Demimuid (1873). Jean de Salisbury. E. Thorin. pp. 238–.

Bibliothèque de l'École des chartes. Librairie Droz. 1843. pp. 234–.

Le Roux de Lincy (1843). La vie et la mort de Saint Thomas de Cantorbery. Didot. pp. 25–.

Egbert Türk (1976). NUGAE CURIALIUM: LE REGNE D'HENRI II. Librairie Droz. pp. 60–. ISBN 978-2-600-03378-7.

Michael Staunton (7 December 2001). The Lives of Thomas Becket. Manchester University Press. ISBN 978-0-7190-5455-6. 172-6
42. The Settlement at Freteval and its aftermath (July-November 1170) 174




Wilfred Lewis Warren (1978). King John. University of California Press. pp. 111–. ISBN 978-0-520-03494-5.



Anne Duggan ( 2004). Thomas Becket. Bloomsbury USA. ISBN 978-0-340-74137-5.
A hollow peace: Freteval and after

David Charles Douglas; George William Greenaway (1996). "146: Herbert Boseham - The Reconciliation between Henry II and Becket"English Historical Documents, 1042-1189. Psychology Press. pp. 886–7. ISBN 978-0-415-14367-7.

Frank Barlow (1990). Thomas Becket. University of California Press. pp. 313–. ISBN 978-0-520-07175-9.

Wilfred Lewis Warren (1973). Henry II. University of California Press. pp. 111–. ISBN 978-0-520-02282-9.

James Craigie Robertson (2012). Materials for the History of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury Volume III. Cambridge University Press. pp. 27–. ISBN 978-1-108-04927-6.

Edward Foss (1870). Biographia Juridica The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. pp. 78–. ISBN 978-1-886363-86-1.

 Keith Sidwell (1995). Reading Medieval Latin. Cambridge University Press. pp. 312–. ISBN 978-0-521-44747-8.


MTB volume 7 p. 326 Epistola 684
Becket to Pope Alexander


Herbert of Bosham

Patres ecclesiae anglicanae : Aldhelmus, Beda, Bonifacius, Arcuionus, Lanfrancus, Anselmus, Thomas Cantuariensis. Herbert of Bosham Life of St. Thomas Book 5: J.-H. Parker. 1845. pp. 303–.
Tomi Quinti: Capitula 1. De pace inter regem et archipraesulem reformata

Materials iii p. 465
James Craigie Robertson; Joseph Brigstocke Sheppard (1965). Materials for the history of Thomas Becket: archbishop of Canterbury (canonized by Pope Alexander III., A. D. 1173). Volume 3. Longman & Company. p. 465.

David Charles Douglas; George William Greenaway (1996). English Historical Documents, 1042-1189. EHD 146: Psychology Press. pp. 886–. ISBN 978-0-415-14367-7.

Pearse, Irene T., "An Annotated Translation of the Life of St. Thomas Becket--Books 5-7" (1944). Master's Theses. Paper 684.
Book 5: Chapter 1. Reconciliation between the King and the Archbishop

1. Reconciliation between the King and the Archbishop

The king, therefore, agreed on a reconciliation when he
saw that the situation was very definitely critical. Thus,
when summoned, we came to that meeting of the kings which was
to take place in the near future. When the conference of the
kings had come to a close on the third day and that Christian
King of the French was on the point of departure, the question
of our reconciliation was the center of discussion on the Continent.
It was carried on by prominent intercessors to whom
the Lord King of France on his departure had entrusted us with
the negotiation of peace terms. He himself could not attend
nor did he wish to. But why expatia\e? Peace was renewed ther
The Archbishop did not request the kiss of peace at this time
which (as I mentioned) was demanded but had been refused. previously
at another conference, neither did the king offer or
refuse it. Although no mention was made of the kiss of peace,
the king publicly, in the presence of a vast assemblage of prelates
and nobles, granted peace and security to the Archbishop
and his relatives in their rights, their usurped chattels and
other movable and immovable possessions. This time that type
of peace was observed and agreed upon which we mentioned above
with reference to the other conference of the kings where our
of our reconciliation was the center of discussion on the Continent.
It was carried on by prominent intercessors to whom
the Lord King of France on his departure had entrusted us with
the negotiation of peace terms. He himself could not attend
nor did he wish to. But why expatiate? Peace was renewed ther
The Archbishop did not request the kiss of peace at this time
which (as I mentioned) was demanded but had been refused. previously
at another conference, neither did the king offer or
refuse it. Although no mention was made of the kiss of peace,
the king publicly, in the presence of a vast assemblage of prelates
and nobles, granted peace and security to the Archbishop
and his relatives in their rights, their usurped chattels and
other movable and immovable possessions. This time that type
of peace was observed and agreed upon which we mentioned above
with reference to the other conference of the kings where our
reconciliation was sealed except for the kiss of peace which
was refused. Now the brave Champion of Christ, anxious for
peace, fearless of death, without demanding the kiss of peace
lest, perhaps, an obstacle be put in the way of peace, advisedly
and prudently accepted that peace as it was offered. Captivated
by the love of peace and all fear of death set aside,
he accepted that peace. It was this love or peace with all
fear of death set aside, a love rather than a brave death that
had sent him forth out of his country. The reconciliation was
effected on the Feast of Mary Magdalen near the site where
the kings' interview had occurred the previous day, evidently
on the borders of Chartres and Le Mans between two castles, one
of which is called Viefui, and the other Freteval. There on
a very beautiful meadow, peace was made, a meadow, as we long
after learned, which was called "Traitors' Meadow" by the inhabitants.
And, indeed, our peace was exactly that.


Thómas Saga Erkibyskups A Life of Archbishop Thomas Becket vol. I p. 461.


Tour de Fréteval

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