Thursday, 20 September 2012

Clarendon Palace


Clarendon Palace, the location where the Constitutions were drawn up and promulgated, a location very near to both Old Sarum [medieval Salisbury, about a 4 mile walk away]. Winchester was close by, and it was just about a day's ride from Southampton, and within 100 miles of London. It was selected for the convocation of the King's Grand Council most likely because of its huge deer park, and proximity to farm lands and store house necessary to be able to provision and feed all those summoned by the king to attend the Council, namely archbishops, bishops, abbot, earls, barons and others, and all their retinue and horses. It was originally a hunting lodge set in a royal forest, but gradually during Henry II's reign it was developing into a major palace with a Great Hall having several ancillary buildings for accommodation, kitchens, wine cellars and so forth; note it was not a castle but a palace, defensive works were minimal. Becket was known to be lodged in Winchester at the time of the Council of Clarendon, January 1164.

Wording on the plaque erected on the site by Sir Henry Hervey Bathurst, owner of the land in 1844:-

"The building of which this fragment formed a part, was long a favourite residence of the English monarchs, and has been historically connected with many important transactions and distinguished characters. Among others, Philip, king of Navarre, here rendered the first homage which was paid to Edward I as king of France; and John, king of France, with David, king of Scots, spent here a portion of their captivity. More especially here were enacted the Constitutions of Clarendon,—the first barrier raised against the claims of secular jurisdiction by the see of Rome. The spirit awakened within these walls ceased not to operate till it had vindicated the authority of the laws, and accomplished the reformation of the Church of England. To prevent the entire destruction of so interesting a memorial of past ages, sirF. H. H. Bathurst, bart., caused it to be supported and strengthened, and this inscription to be affixed, A.D. 1844." 






Photoset 1 https://flic.kr/s/aHskvPJgDL Clarendon Palace May 1st 2016

Photoset 2 https://flic.kr/s/aHskzmtYi3 Clarendon Palace May 1st 2016

Photoset Clarendon Palace June 2017 https://goo.gl/photos/mXmQMUJ5HJi4FKz49

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarendon_Palace

http://www.astoft.co.uk/clarendonpalace.htm

http://www.gatehouse-gazetteer.info/English%20sites/3986.html

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=51.0703&lon=-1.7416&z=16&l=0&m=s&v=9&search=51.0703%2C%20-1.7416

The Antiquarian and Architectural Year Book for 1844. The Royal Palace of Clarendon, Wilts: T. C. Newby. 1845. pp. 120–.

Wikimapia - Remains of Clarendon Palace

http://www.geograph.org.uk/gridref/SU1830

OS Map of Clarendon Palace

The Antiquarian and Architectural Year Book for 1844. The Royal Palace of Clarendon, Wilts: T. C. Newby. 1845. pp. 120–
Royal forests | A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 4 (pp. 391-433)
<http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=102825&strquery=%22clarendon%20palace%22#s8>

Amanda Richardson (2005). The forest, park and palace of Clarendon, c. 1200-c. 1650: reconstructing an actual, conceptual and documented Wiltshire landscape. Archaeopress.ISBN 978-1-84171-825-5.

T. B. James; Anne M. Robinson; Elizabeth S. Eames (1988). Clarendon Palace: the history and archaeology of a medieval palace and hunting lodge near Salisbury, Wiltshire. Society of Antiquaries of London. ISBN 978-0-85431-248-1.

T. B. James; Christopher M. Gerrard (2007). Clarendon: landscape of kings. Windgather. ISBN 978-1-905119-11-0. 

Anthony Emery (2007). Discovering Medieval Houses. Osprey Publishing. pp. 25–. ISBN 978-0-7478-0655-4.

Anthony Emery (2007). Discovering Medieval Houses. Osprey Publishing. pp. 33–. ISBN 978-0-7478-0655-4.
  
Chronology; or, A concise view of the annals of England: Wherein every particular occurrence from the descent of Julius Cæsar, to the present time ... is ... recorded, with the date affixed: also, an exact chronology of the lives of the most eminent men, in all ages of the world. To which is added a plan of the Saxon heptarchy .... J. Almon. 1769. pp. 86–.

William Stukeley (1776). Itinerarium curiosum; or, An account of the antiquities, and remarkable curiosities in nature or art, observed in travels through Great Britain. Printed for Baker and Leigh. pp. 4–

John Steane (2014). The Archaeology of Medieval England and Wales. Clarendon Palace (incl. Plan): Routledge. pp. 13–15. ISBN 978-1-317-59994-4.

John Steane (2003). The Archaeology of the Medieval English Monarchy. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-134-64158-1.


The Cycle of Images in the Palaces and Castles of Henry III
Tancred Borenius
Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes , Vol. 6, (1943) , pp. 40-50

Tancred Borenius and John Charlton (1936).
Clarendon Palace: An Interim Report.
The Antiquaries Journal / Volume 16 / Issue 01 / January 1936, pp 55-84

Nikolaus Pevsner; Bridget Cherry (1975). Wiltshire. Clarendon Palace: Yale University Press. pp. 180–. ISBN 978-0-300-09659-0.

The Gentleman's Magazine. F. Jefferies. 1833. pp. 142–.

"Survey of the Manor and Forest of Clarendon" by Phillipps"Archaeologia:. Society of Antiquaries of London. 1834. pp. 151–8.



Peter Hall (1834). A brief history of Old and New Sarum. pp. 30–.


The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales A. Fullarton and Company. 1841. pp. 458–.

Archaeologia ; Or, Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to AntiquitySurvey of the Manor and Forest of Clarendon, Wiltshire, in 1272.: Society of Antiquaries of London. 1833. pp. 151–.



King Alfred's Archaeology:- The Clarendon Project - http://goo.gl/uLLmWN

T. B. James; Anne M. Robinson; Elizabeth S. Eames (1988). Clarendon Palace: the history and archaeology of a medieval palace and hunting lodge near Salisbury, Wiltshire. Society of Antiquaries of London. ISBN 978-0-85431-248-1.


T. B. James; Christopher Gerrard (2007). Clarendon: landscape of kings. Windgather. ISBN 978-1-905119-10-3.

John Nichols (1833). The Gentleman's Magazine. Survey of the Manor and Forest of Clarendon, Wilts.: E. Cave. pp. 142–.



Journal of the British Archaeological Association. British Archaeological Association. 1859. pp. 203–.

Historic England Clarendon Palace https://goo.gl/Ni6cor 

Clarendon Palace - Revolvy 









More images

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/pubid-1056/images/fig13.gif
fig13.gif (GIF Image, 2332 × 2669 pixels) - Scaled (23%) - http://bit.ly/1SG3dBd


http://www.british-history.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/pubid-1056/images/fig14.gif
fig14.gif (GIF Image, 1921 × 2026 pixels) - Scaled (31%) - http://bit.ly/1SG3BiS
 

SU1830 :: Browse 18 Images :: Geograph Britain and Ireland

Roman roads and other historic routes in vicinity of Clarendon Palace

Roman Roads in Britain by Thomas Codrington
Port-Way

Roman Road Hub at Calleva [Silchester]

Port-Way

Devil's Highway

Iter Britanniarum

Iter XV [2 Kms from Clarendon Palace]
Venta Belgarum [Winchester] <> Brige [Broughton] <> Sorbioduni [Old Sarum]
Antonine Itinerary for Britain [ Iter Britanniarum]

Monarch's Way

Modern access to Clarendon Palace is via footpath known as The Clarendon Way


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